2nd TFO Awards Part 11: Picture and Director Categories (with final round-up)

The last awards are:

Best Director

Best Motion Picture

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Best Director

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Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan

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David O. Russell – The Fighter

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Christopher Nolan – Inception

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Tom Hooper – The King’s Speech

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David Fincher – The Social Network

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Gold: Darren Aronofsky – Black Swan

Silver: David Fincher – The Social Network

Bronze: Christopher Nolan – Inception

Runners-Up: David O. Russell – The Fighter, Tom Hooper – The King’s Speech
Finalists: Romanb Polanski – The Ghost Writer, Boong Joon-Ho – Mother, Claire Denis – White Material, Derek Cianfrance – Blue Valentine, Alejandro Amenabar – Agora, Jerrold Tarog – Shake Rattle and Roll 12 (PUNERARYA Episode), Yorgos Lanthimos – Dogtooth
Semi-Finalists: John Cameron Mitchell – Rabbit Hole, Luca Guadagnino – I Am Love, Lisa Cholodenko – The Kids Are All Right, Joel and Ethan Coen – True Grit, Doug Liman – Fair Game, Matt Reeves – Let Me In, Debra Granik – Winter’s Bone, Mike Leigh – Another Year
Shortlisted: Jessica Hausner – Lourdes, Anton Corbijn – The American, Rob Reiner – Flipped, David Michod – Animal Kingdom, Stephen Frears – Tamara Drewe

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Best Motion Picture

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Agora – Alvaro Augustin, Fernando Bovaira

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Black Swan – Scott Franklin, Ari Handel, Mike Medavoy, Arnold Messer, Brian Oliver

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Blue Valentine – Lynette Howell, Alex Orlovsky, Jamie Patricof

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The Fighter – Dorothy Aufiero, David Hoberman, Todd Lieberman, Ryan Kavanaugh, Paul Tamasy, Mark Wahlberg

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The Ghost Writer – Robert Benmussa, Roman Polanski, Alain Sarde

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I Am Love – Luca Guadagnino, Francesco Melzi d’Eril, Marco Morabito, Tilda Swinton, Alessandro Usai, Massimiliano Volante

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Inception – Christopher Nolan, Emma Thomas

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The King’s Speech – Iain Canning, Emile Sherman, Gareth Unwin

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The Social Network – Dana Brunetti, Cean Chaffin, Michael De Luca, Scott Rudin

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White Material – Pascal Caucheteux

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Gold: Inception

Silver: Blue Valentine

Bronze: Black Swan

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To see the complete list of all the 2010 films I have seen, I will be posting a page titled 2010 in Film, then films are separated by letter grade. 🙂

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Now, the official list of nominees!

Click Here

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Previous Awards page:

Actress in a Leading Role /Actor in a Leading Role / Actress in a Supporting Role / Actor in a Supporting Role / Ensemble Cast / Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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Thanks for journeying with me to this year! I know, I’m too delayed, but I just want to see more eligible films as possible, so that’s it!

The next year to be discussed for the Best Picture Project is already on, but before I make the official announcement page, I’ll give you three clues for that year:

  • Depressed wrecks
  • Fight for survival
  • Murder is fun!

2nd TFO Awards PART 10: Actress in a Leading Role

The next award is:

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

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Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

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The Nominees:

Kirsten Dunst – All Good Things

Emotional devastation completely evident. Haunts you when she’s off-screen. Gives the life of the film. Never showing off, but powerful nonetheless.

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Nicole Kidman – Rabbit Hole

In silence, she nails the grief when she cannot express it. She’s almost paralyzed. Internal struggle to move on and to keep the past is very affecting.

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Lesley Manville – Another Year

Drives the character with full precision and skill. She does some things that are unsympathetic, but she still wins us over. The last shot – it sticks in my mind.

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Natalie Portman – Black Swan

Mindblowing. Transition of personality was very believable. Her feeling of being trapped in the situation feels genuine. Embodies the ballerina personality.

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Michelle Williams – Blue Valentine

As raw as acting can get. Takes no prisoners in being the unflinching portrait of love blossoming and marriage deconstructing. Relentless in showing the good and bad of the character.

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Gold: Natalie Portman – Black Swan

Silver: Michelle Williams – Blue Valentine

Bronze: Nicole Kidman – Rabbit Hole

Runners-Up: Lesley Manville – Another Year, Kirsten Dunst – All Good Things

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The Finalists:

Naomi Watts adds the right amount of fragility when she’s tough to make Fair Game her own | By letting her be absorbed in Mother‘s crazy world, Kim Hye-Ja is very absorbing despite weirdness | Never lets her guard down, nobody does authority like Annette Bening in The Kids Are All Right | To sum it all up, Emma Stone doesn’t own Easy A. She is the movie Easy A | Understandably bitchy, Paprika Steen lets go of herself for us to see how she descends to undeniable loneliness in Applaus | Blending vulnerability, courage, humility, and smarts, Carla Abellana is one memorable horror heroine in Shake Rattle and Roll 12 (PUNERARYA Episode) | Jennifer Lawrence is so non-flashy, but you can feel the determination to live and to survive in her body language in Winter’s Bone

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The Semi-Finalists:

I buy how Rachel Weisz portrays the high knowledge her character has in Agora with full radiance | Playfulness, hopelessness, hopefulness – Anne Hathaway is the miracle of Love and Other Drugs | Kristen Stewart continues to prove she’s more than a charmer in her emotional nakedness in Welcome to the Rileys | Drew Barrymore knows how to inject warmth in the most hilarious moments and humor in the more dramatic moments in Going the Distance | Hilary Swank completely involves us in her struggle for justice in Conviction | Sensitive despite her dark nature, Chloe Grace Moretz owns every scene she has in Let Me In with total ease and gentleness | She’s that famous tough cookie in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but Noomi Rapace adds more shades in her personal tragedy | Julianne Moore executes her role in The Kids Are All Right with visible acting experience

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The Shortlisted Ones:

21. Tilda Swinton – I Am Love

22. Carey Mulligan – Never Let Me Go

23. Julia Roberts – Eat Pray Love

24. Rosamund Pike – Barney’s Version

25. Patricia Clarkson – Cairo Time

26. Halle Berry – Frankie and Alice

27. Rebecca Hall – The Town

28. Sally Hawkins – Made in Dagenham

29. Annette Bening – Mother and Child

30. Catherine Keener – Please Give

31. Julianna Marguiles – City Island

32. Hailee Steinfeld – True Grit

33. Naomi Watts – Mother and Child

34. Gemma Arterton – Tamara Drewe

35. Ellen Burstyn – Lovely, Still

36. Rachel McAdams – Morning Glory

37. Diane Lane – Secretariat

38. Emma Bell – Frozen

39. Marisa Tomei – Cyrus

40. Kerry Washington – Mother and Child

41. Ruth Sheen – Another Year

42. Isabelle Huppert – White Material

43. Emily Blunt – The Wolfman

44. Mary Elizabeth Winstead – Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

45. Madeline Carroll – Flipped

46. Susan Sarandon – The Greatest

47. Sylvie Testud – Lourdes

48. Angelina Jolie – Salt

49. Greta Gerwig – Greenberg

50. Carey Mulligan – The Greatest

51. Demi Moore – The Joneses

52. Ashley Bell – The Last Exorcism

53. Elle Fanning – Somewhere

54. Amy Ryan – Jack Goes Boating

55. Gwyneth Paltrow – Country Strong

56. Angelina Jolie – The Tourist

57. Radha Mitchell – The Crazies

58. Cecile de France – Hereafter

59. Gemma Arterton – The Disappearance of Alice Creed

60. Reese Witherspoon – How Do You Know

61. Mia Wasikowska – Alice in Wonderland

62. Katie Jarvis – Fish Tank

63. Aggeliki Papoulia – Dogtooth

64. Amanda Seyfried – Letters to Juliet

65. Whitney Able – Monsters

66. Helen Mirren – The Tempest

67. Elizabeth Banks – The Next Three Days

68. Renee Zellweger – Case 39

69. Christina Aguilera – Burlesque

70. Katherine Heigl – Life As We Know It

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Previous Awards page:

Actor in a Leading Role / Actress in a Supporting Role / Actor in a Supporting Role / Ensemble Cast / Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing? Share your thoughts in the comment box! 🙂

2nd TFO Awards PART 9: Actor in a Leading Role

The next award is:

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role

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Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role

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The Nominees:

Javier Bardem – Biutiful

Knows what he is doing even if it almost appears like it’s spontaneous. Hits all the right notes for us to feel the physical and emotional exhaustion he’s undergoing.

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Jesse Eisenberg – The Social Network

Very calculated but extremely unpredictable. Puts appropriate likeability despite pompousness and iciness of the character.

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Colin Firth – The King’s Speech

Pushes the loser bag enough for us to care but not too much for us to be annoyed. In quietness comes suppressed sadness and hopelessness.

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Brian Geraghty – Easier with Practice

Masks implied inferiority complex with smile and kindness that feels real. Kindhearted but also flawed. Final minutes of the film brings out the best in him.

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Ryan Gosling – Blue Valentine

Emotionally raw, charged, bruised. Being so much in the character. Soulful rendition of the past and present of his character. Breathtakingly real, it aches so much.

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Gold: Ryan Gosling – Blue Valentine

Silver: Colin Firth – The King’s Speech

Bronze: Jesse Eisenberg – The Social Network

Runners-Up: Brian Geraghty – Easier with Practice, Javier Bardem – Biutiful

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The Finalists:

Every moment of 127 Hours feels so real, and that’s because of James Franco | Slick and alert, only two of the words that can describe Ewan McGregor‘s surprisingly humane take as The Ghost Writer | Aaron Eckhart is so adept in his role in Rabbit Hole that you don’t notice the acting before the emotional outbursts | The American is pretty much a showcase of subtle acting for George Clooney who is tortured beneath the roughness of his job | Delightful mix of subtle comedy and low-key drama makes Geoffrey Rush such a perfect match for The King’s Speech | Won Bin finds the perfect mix of weird, sympathetic, and humorous in Mother | Leonardo DiCaprio continues to get better, now with a paranoid but completely understandable character that he gives justice in Shutter Island

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The Semi-Finalists:

His role in The Fighter demands 100% effort, and Christian Bale puts his heart and soul into it | Kodi-Smit McPhee delivers the curiosity of his character in Let Me In with full honesty | His comedic scenes in Barney’s Version are effective, but it’s his dramatic scenes prevail the emotional punch Paul Giamatti can give | Casino Jack wants to emphasize on the loud moments, but Kevin Spacey is more memorable when he’s playing deceit quietly | Callan McAuliffe approaches his role with direct meekness and sincerity, which makes Flipped such a pleasure to watch | Martin Landau slowly peels off the layers of his character in Lovely, Still with such care | Stephen Dorff attacks his role in Somewhere with passive nuance, giving surprises amidst the film’s decided slowness | He’s caught between showier actors, so Mark Wahlberg makes the nice move to hold back and ground his performance in The Fighter with believable simplicity and humility

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The Shortlisted Ones:

21. Max Minghella – Agora

22. James Gandolfini – Welcome to the Rileys

23. Leonardo DiCaprio – Inception

24. Jim Carrey – I Love You, Philip Morris

25. Andy Garcia – City Island

26. Jeff Bridges – True Grit

27. Ryan Reynolds – Buried

28. Jim Sturgess – The Way Back

29. Sean Penn – Fair Game

30. Zach Galifianakis – Due Date

31. Jake Gyllenhaal – Love and Other Drugs

32. Robert Downey, Jr. – Due Date

33. Matt Damon – Green Zone

34. Alexander Siddig – Cairo Time

35. Chris Messina – Devil

36. Robert Pattinson – Remember Me

37. John C. Reilly – Cyrus

38. Jim Broadbent – Another Year

39. Shia LaBeouf – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

40. James Frecheville – Animal Kingdom

41. Ben Affleck – The Town

42. Casey Affleck – The Killer Inside Me

43. Matt Damon – Hereafter

44. Edward Norton – Leaves of Grass

45. Pierce Brosnan – The Greatest

46. Benicio del Toro – the Wolfman

47. Timothy Olymphant – The Crazies

48. Justin Long – Going the Distance

49. Johnny Depp – Alice in Wonderland

50. Ben Affleck – The Company Men

51. Philip Seymour Hoffman – Jack Goes Boating

52. Aaron Johnson – Nowhere Boy

53. Scoot McNairy – Monsters

54. Robert Duvall – Get Low

55. Ben Stiller- Greenberg

56. Michael Nyqvist – The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo

57. Ryan Gosling – All Good Things

58. Michael Cera – Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

59. James Franco – Howl

60. Paul Rudd – How Do You Know

61. Romain Duris – Heartbreaker

62. Christos Stergioglou – Dogtooth

63. Johnny Depp – The Tourist

64. Michael Douglas – Solitary Man

65. Stellan Skarsgard – Frankie and Alice

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Previous Awards page:

Actress in a Supporting Role / Actor in a Supporting Role / Ensemble Cast / Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing? Share your thoughts in the comment box! 🙂

2nd TFO Awards PART 8: Actress in a Supporting Role

The next award is:

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role

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Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role

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The Nominees:

Amy Adams – The Fighter

Toughness feels real, but sensitivity is very much there. Evokes warmth even if she is one tough cookie.

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Melissa Leo – The Fighter

Commands every scene with power that completely shakes everyone else, but never loses the motherly care for her children.

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Kristin Scott-Thomas – Nowhere Boy

Strict and upright to a fault, but that’s because she cares for her character and for John Lennon so much. Plays it cool everytime.

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Jacki Weaver – Animal Kingdom

Threatening, yet I don’t hate her. It’s as if I understand why she was doing everything even if her character makes matters worse.

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Olivia Williams – The Ghost Writer

Mystery deeply buried in every move and in every look. Deception has never been gracefully delivered, almost like a femme fatale.

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Gold: Jacki Weaver – Animal Kingdom

Silver: Melissa Leo – The Fighter

Bronze: Amy Adams – The Fighter

Runners-Up: Olivia Williams – The Ghost Writer, Kristin Scott-Thomas – Nowhere Boy

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The Finalists:

Using subtlety to convey the emotional current The King’s Speech has, Helena Bonham Carter channels purity of heart and delightful truthfulness | Being in Alice in Wonderland means being over-the-top, and Helena Bonham Carter delivers it with explosiveness | Barbara Hershey is the wounded soul that anchors the darkness and obsession that Black Swan is all about | Devastation and helplessness is all over the place in For Colored Girls, but Kimberly Elise‘s creation is the most vivid | Her smile already feels close to home, but Dianne Weist‘s reaching out to Becca’s grieving woman is also heartbreaking in Rabbit Hole | Sexy and sly, friendly and approachable, yet strikingly deceiving, Mila Kunis carries the nocturnal side of sex in Black Swan | In just three scenes, Rooney Mara becomes the conscience of The Social Network by masterfully handling the dialogue she has

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The Semi-Finalists:

Who cares if her character is a cliche? Blake Lively is the secret weapon of The Town | Haunting, alarming, but unexpectedly someone you trust in, Dale Dickey humanizes a horrifying human being in Winter’s Bone | Anne-Marie Duff nails the sexual nature of her role without losing her motherliness in Nowhere Boy | Maybe underused, but Diane Keaton uses every moment she has to provide the biggest laughs of Morning Glory | Powerfully seductive, but also emotionally torn, Thandie Newton is surprisingly sympathetic in For Colored Girls | Only appearing in key scenes, Rosamund Pike acts with poise and strength in Made in Dagenham | As Inception‘s mysterious emotional core, Marion Cotillard acts like a pro, puts the danger in the story with mastery | Having fun in a role is never a sin. Minnie Driver delivers the source of life in Barney’s Version before the romance of the story even comes in

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The Shortlisted Ones:

21. Keira Knightley – Never Let Me Go

22. Ellen Wong – Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

23. Patricia Clarkson – Shutter Island

24. Vanessa Redgrave – Letters to Juliet

25. Sissy Spacek – Get Low

26. Mia Wasikowska – The Kids Are All Right

27. Imelda Staunton – Another Year

28. Loretta Devine – For Colored Girls

29. Christina Applegate – Going the Distance

30. Maricel Alvarez – Biutiful

31. Patricia Clarkson – Easy A

32. Janet Jackson – For Colored Girls

33. Anika Noni Rose – For Colored Girls

34. Miranda Richardson – Made in Dagenham

35. Daphne Rubin-Vega – Jack Goes Boating

36. Maria Paiato – I Am Love

37. Minnie Driver – Conviction

38. Susan Sarandon – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

39. Melissa Leo – Welcome to the Rileys

40. Cher – Burlesque

41. Shareeka Epps – Mother and Child

42. Rebecca Hall – Please Give

43. Carey Mulligan – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

44. Denise Grayson – The Social Network

45. Ann Guilbert – Please Give

46. Anne Hathaway – Valentine’s Day

47. Tamsin Greig – Tamara Drewe

48. Ellen Page – Inception

49. Michelle Williams – Shutter Island

50. Tammy Blanchard – Rabbit Hole

51. Charlotte Rampling – Never let Me Go

52. Jennifer Ehle – The King’s Speech

53. Viola Davis – Eat Pray Love

54. Yaya DaCosta – The Kids Are All Right

55. Kristen Wiig – All Good Things

56. Winona Ryder – Black Swan

57. Sally Hawkins – Never Let Me Go

58. Helena Noguerra – Heartbreaker

59.  Kierston Wareing – Fish Tank

60. Jennifer Garner – Valentine’s Day

61. Bryce Dallas Howard – Hereafter

62. Sandra Oh – Rabbit Hole

63. Rashida Jones – The Social Network

64. Naomi Watts – You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

65. Gemma Jones – You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

66. Kerry Washington – For Colored Girls

67. Anna Kendrick – Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

68. Andrea Riseborough – Never Let Me Go

69. Karina Fernandez – Another Year

70. Allison Pill – Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

71. Lucy Punch – You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

72. Phylicia Rashad – For Colored Girls

73. Jessica Barden – Tamara Drewe

74. Macy Gray – For Colored Girls

75. Robin Bartlett – Shutter Island

76. Alba Rohwacher – I Am Love

77. Anne Hathaway – Alice in Wonderland

78. Leighton Meester – Country Strong

79. Amy Ryan – Green Zone

80. Rosemarie DeWitt – The Company Men

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Previous Awards page:

Actor in a Supporting Role / Ensemble Cast / Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing? Share your thoughts in the comment box! 🙂

2nd TFO Awards PART 7: Actor in a Supporting Actor

The next award is:

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role

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Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role

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The Nominees:

Andrew Garfield – Never Let Me Go

Innocence feels so genuine. Each scene has the emotionally authentic mark on it, making his final scenes the film’s most heartbreaking.

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Andrew Garfield – The Social Network

Surprisingly the immediate source of human emotion in the film, nailing the supportive friend arc with full blast and skill.

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John Hawkes – Winter’s Bone

Terrifying yet someone to fall back on. We never become quite sure whether he’s really on our side or not, but it adds the mystery of it which makes him extremely haunting.

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Josh Hutcherson – The Kids Are All Right

Gets the curiosity of the character with the right amount of meekness and youthful angst, making his character a complete human being.

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Ewan McGregor – I Love You, Philip Morris

The sweetness is so real that you just got to go with it. But aside from that, he never forgets to add multiple sides of the character.

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Gold: Andrew Garfield – The Social Network

Silver: John Hawkes – Winter’s Bone

Bronze: Andrew Garfield – Never Let Me Go

Runners-Up: Josh Hutcherson – The Kids Are All Right, Ewan McGregor – I Love You, Philip Morris

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The Finalists:

With a character that can be as reliable as he is suspicious, only an actor like Michael Fassbender can do that in Fish Tank | Acting experience is very much evident with great comedic timing in Dustin Hoffman with his paternal role in Barney’s Version | Constructing a multi-faceted plot device out of paper thin material, Sam Rockwell proves to be an actor to look out for in Conviction | Empowered with authority everytime he’s on screen but also with a reassuring presence, Pierce Brosnan continues to do wonders in The Ghost Writer | Sensitivity in handling guilt over grief was a powerful mix with innocence, thanks to Miles Teller in Rabbit Hole | Unexpectedly heartbreaking, Cillian Murphy does most in his somewhat limited yet very effective role in Inception | Playing with teenage curiosity but fueled with more aggressive power, Ezra Miller completes the family in City Island with unfaltering skill

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The Semi-Finalists:

Playing it all cool as he slowly descends to paranoia and distrust, Barry Pepper properly shows off his acting in Casino Jack | Sly, quick, approachable, enjoyable, yet discreetly greedy, Justin Timberlake is in control of Sean Parker and becomes him in The Social Network with complete ease | Beneath the hilarious comedic acts of Harrison Ford are the hinted points of loneliness and real emotions, something Morning Glory was somewhat lacking | Delivers the character with full-spirited joy, Secretariat has lot to thank to John Malkovich for enhancing the rousing excitement of the film | Equipped with natural comic instincts, Kieran Culkin provides the strongest comedy player of Scott Pilgrim vs. the World | Handling the morality play of the film’s crucial plot point, Guy Pearce show how knowledgeable he is in not letting his character be misinterpreted in The King’s Speech | As a conflicted heir in I Am Love, Flavio Parenti brings the upright man he is with restraint and conviction | Offering White Material‘s most haunting victim of circumstances, Nicolas Duvauchelle slowly shows his psychological disintegration with unabashed courage

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The Shortlisted Ones:

21. Sid Lucero – Shake Rattle and Roll 12 (PUNERARYA Episode)

22. Jeremy Renner – The Town

23. Richard Jenkins – Eat Pray Love

24. Richard Jenkins – Let Me In

25. Greg Kinnear – Green Zone

26. Jon Hamm – The Town

27.  John Ortiz – Jack Goes Boating

28. Josh Brolin – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

29. Michael Douglas – Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps

30. Chris Cooper – The Company Men

31. Mark Ruffalo – The Kids Are All Right

32. Barry Pepper – True Grit

33. Lucas Black – Get Low

34. Bob Hoskins – Made in Dagenham

35. Billy Crudup – Eat Pray Love

36. Armie Hammer – The Social Netowrk

37. Tom Wilkinson – The Ghost Writer

38. Douglas Urbanski – The Social Network

39. Joseph Gordon-Levitt – Inception

40. Vincent Cassel – Black Swan

41. Tom Hardy – Inception

42. Guy Pearce – Animal Kingdom

43. Oscar Isaac – Agora

44. Jonah Hill – Cyrus

45. Joel Edgerton – Animal Kingdom

46. Khalid Abdalla – Green Zone

47. Roger Allam – Tamara Drewe

48. Pete Postlethwaite – The Town

49. Bill Murray – Get Low

50. Oliver Platt – Please Give

51. Max Minghella – The Social Network

52. Adam Scott – Lovely, Still

53. Michel Gambon – The King’s Speech

54. Matt Damon – True Grit

55. Crispin Glover – Alice in Wonderland

56. Joaquin Garrido – The Kids Are All Right

57. Ed Harris – The Way Back

58. Tommy Lee Jones – The Company Men

59. Colin Farrell – The Way Back

60. Paul Bettany – The Tourist

61. Frank Langella – All Good Things

62. Stanley Tucci – Easy A

63. Samuel L. Jackson – Mother and Child

64. Ben Kingsley – Shutter Island

65. Thomas Haden Church – Easy A

66. Chris Cooper – The Town

67. Tim McGraw – Country Strong

68. Owen Wilson – How Do You Know

69. Josh Brolin – True Grit

70. Ken Watanabe – Inception

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Previous Awards page:

Ensemble Cast / Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing? Share your thoughts in the comment box! 🙂

2nd TFO Awards PART 6: Ensemble Cast

The next award is:

Best Performance by an Ensemble Cast

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Best Performance by an Ensemble Cast

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Another Year – Michele Austin, David Bradley, Jim Broadbent, Phil Davis, Karina Fernandez, Oliver Maltman, Lesley Manville, Martin Savage, Ruth Sheen, Imelda Staunton, Peter Wight

Each of the performances compliment with each other, composing a story that feels very local and close to home. Even the smallest roles in the film are acted with such veracity and sincerity that it becomes achingly real.

Ensemble Moment: The lunch at the backyard

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The Fighter – Amy Adams, Christian Bale, Kate B. O’Brien, Bianca Hunter, Jenna Lamia, Melissa Leo, Sugar Ray Leonard, Erica McDermott, Jack McGee, Melissa McMeekin, Mickey O’Keefe, Jill Quigg, Dendrie Taylor, Mark Wahlberg

The film itself is quite focused on Dicky and Mickey, but the story is sprinkled with lots of  actors who actually have their own defined characters. Casting the sisters alone is a big achievement, but to see them actually being the sisters was more thrilling.

Ensemble Moment: Charlene’s Fight with the Ward Sisters

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The Kids Are All Right – Annette Bening, Yaya DaCosta, Joaquín Garrido, Eddie Hassell, Josh Hutcherson, Zosia Mamet, Julianne Moore, Mark Ruffalo, Kunal Sharma, Mia Wasikowska

Out of the five nominees here, this film feels most focused on its ensemble. Its cast isn’t big as the others, but the amount of time the film spends on each character propelled by actors possibly in their finest brings the best out of the story.

Ensemble Moment: Dinner in Paul’s Place

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The King’s Speech – Anthony Andrews, Dominic Applewhite, David Bamber, Eve Best, Claire Bloom, Helena Bonham Carter, Jennifer Ehle, Colin Firth, Michael Gambon, Calum Gittins, Roger Hammond, Derek Jacobi, Ramona Marquez, Guy Pearce, Geoffrey Rush, Timothy Spall, Freya Wilson, Ben Wimsett

Starting from the royalties down to the commoners, the film very much feels classy and stylized yet so real, thanks to its cast. Like in the case of The Fighter, the film is mostly focused on Lionel and Bertie, but everytime you see other characters, it adds more texture to the story.

Ensemble Moment: Bertie’s Final Speech

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The Social Network – Bryan Barter, Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, John Getz, Denise Grayson, Armie Hammer, Rashida Jones, Patrick Mapel, Rooney Mara, Joseph Mazzello, Max Minghella, Josh Pence, David Selby, Brenda Song, Justin Timberlake, Douglas Urbanski

With a intensely complex screenplay, dialogue-wise, you got to have actors to handle it. And boy, did they deliver. Jesse Eisenberg was the perfect choice for the lead role, Justin Timberlake is so right for the part, Rooney Mara is a blast, and Andrew Garfield is fantastic, but aren’t they all?

Ensemble Moment: Disposition Scenes

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Gold: The Social Network – Bryan Barter, Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, John Getz, Denise Grayson, Armie Hammer, Rashida Jones, Patrick Mapel, Rooney Mara, Joseph Mazzello, Max Minghella, Josh Pence, David Selby, Brenda Song, Justin Timberlake, Douglas Urbanski

Silver: Another Year – Michele Austin, David Bradley, Jim Broadbent, Phil Davis, Karina Fernandez, Oliver Maltman, Lesley Manville, Martin Savage, Ruth Sheen, Imelda Staunton, Peter Wight

Bronze: The Kids Are All Right – Annette Bening, Yaya DaCosta, Joaquín Garrido, Eddie Hassell, Josh Hutcherson, Zosia Mamet, Julianne Moore, Mark Ruffalo, Kunal Sharma, Mia Wasikowska

Runners-Up: The King’s Speech, The Fighter
Finalists: Rabbit Hole, Animal Kingdom, Toy Story 3, For Colored Girls, Black Swan, The Ghost Writer, Dogtooth
Semi-Finalists: Please Give, I Am Love, City Island, Inception, Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, Morning Glory, Made in Dagenham, Tamara Drewe
Shortlisted: Mother and Child, The Town, Never Let Me Go, Easy A, Alice in Wonderland

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Previous Awards page:

Screenplay and Animation Categories / Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing?

2nd TFO Awards PART 5: Screenplay and Animation Categories

The following awards are:

Best Adapted Screenplay

Best Original Screenplay

Best Animated Feature

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Best Adapted Screenplay

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Flipped – Rob Reiner, Andrew Scheinman

The idea of actually continuously switching sides of the girl and the boy in telling the story is a brilliant idea, but to actually do that well is more surprising. Always fully understanding the emotions of these two lead characters effectively makes this love story lot more effective.

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The Ghost Writer – Robert Harris, Roman Polanski

The screenplay knows how to identify each character, define them from everybody else, show their facets, and hide their dimensions. It brilliantly constructs each scene with an underlying tension put by the force of each word intelligently chosen to compose the smart dialogue.

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Rabbit Hole – David Lindsay-Abaire

The emotions from each word the characters say makes the film entirely textured. Howie’s struggle to keep up with life and Becca’s inability to move on and how they conflict even with those quiet exchange of words are especially evident.

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The Social Network – Aaron Sorkin

It starts the film with a blast I haven’t experienced before. Words haven’t felt like a machine gun since… Network, I guess? The work of the screenplay is very visible throughout the film, yet the style that the screenplay used is never tiring. An instant classic.

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Toy Story 3 – (Screenplay) Michael Arndt, (Story) John Lassater, Andrew Stanton, Lee Unkrich

I don’t know where to place this nominee (original or adapted?), but I’m pretty sure it would be in either way. I chose this one to be here because of the fact that all of the events here, one way or the other, had been based on events from previous installments, but whatever. Humor and pathos in an animated film, you could only have that in a Pixar film. And boy, I had it.

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Gold: The Social Network – Aaron Sorkin

Silver: The Ghost Writer – Robert Harris, Roman Polanski

Bronze: Rabbit Hole – David Lindsay-Abaire

Runners-Up: Flipped, Toy Story 3
Finalists: Fair Game, Easier With Practice, How to Train Your Dragon, Never Let Me Go, Let Me In, Tamara Drewe, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo
Semi-Finalists: 127 Hours, Shutter Island, True Grit, Winter’s Bone, I Love You Philip Morris, Barney’s Version

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Best Original Screenplay

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Another Year – Mike Leigh

Slow burning revelation of each character is wisely used in the film. It’s not the exactly the words of these characters that turn the story, but on how these characters react on each situation. It’s not that much of a showy effort, but you know it’s there, so here it is.

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Blue Valentine – Derek Cianfrance, Joey Curtis, Cami Delavigne

The parallel unfolding of the two stories composing this tragic tale of marriage takes its time in forming its characters with full ease and dramatic tension. Of course, it could be largely owed to the dynamite performances of the two leads, but the creation of the screenplay was indeed a very big help.

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Due Date – Alan R. Cohen, Alan Freedland, Todd Phillips, Adam Sztykiel

I admit. Comparing this to the other four nominees in this category, this nominee looks like a category filler. But that does not discount its achievements. It succeeds with the witty dialogue that can be outrageously hilarious to subtly heartbreaking. It’s one of those raunchy and edgy comedies that worked a lot.

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The Fighter – (Screenplay) Eric Johnson, John Silver, Paul Tamasy, (Story) Keith Dorrington, Eric Johnson, Paul Tamasy

The story itself is ripe of cliche, but it’s how these characters to each other that gives the film the unexpected synergy, humor, pathos, and humanity. For example, Alice Ward herself is a creation that Melissa Leo gave life in, but the screenplay provides the strong material that she’s got to work with.

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Inception – Christopher Nolan

A film that’s so complicated yet so accessible. It twists and turns, but it knows for a fact that it is not the main focus of the story, so it executes those with gracefulness. And surprisingly, there is lot of heart in it. The subplot with Mal is one of the screenplay’s better parts, providing human emotions when you least expect it.

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Gold: Inception – Christopher Nolan

Silver: Another Year – Mike Leigh

Bronze: Blue Valentine – Derek Cianfrance, Joey Curtis, Cami Delavigne

Runners-Up: The Fighter, Due Date
Finalists: Going the Distance, The King’s Speech, The Kids Are All Right, City Island, Made in Dagnham, Dogtooth, Please Give
Semi-Finalists: Welcome to the Rileys, The Town, Greenberg

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Best Animated Feature

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Despicable Me – Pierre Coffin, Chris Renaud

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How to Train Your Dragon – Chris Sanders, Dean DeBlois

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The Illusionist – Sylvain Chomet

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Tangled – Nathan Greno, Bryon Howard

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Toy Story 3 – Lee Unkrich

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Gold: Toy Story 3 – Lee Unkrich

Silver: How to Train Your Dragon – Chris Sanders, Dean DeBlois

Bronze: The Illusionist – Sylvain Chomet

Runners-Up: Despicable Me, Tangled

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Previous Awards page:

Visual Categories 1 / Visual Categories 2 / Aural Categories / Scene Categories

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So far, how are your bets doing?