THE VERDICT – Best Motion Picture: 2005

And just like the previous years, it took me forever to finish this, but here they are!

I kept on switching # 5 and #4, but upon rewatching, #4 really grew on me. #3 and #2 were actually what I was expecting to be the possible winners, but #1 really surprised me, thanks again to rewatching.

You can just click on the titles for their profiles.

2005

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5. Munich

Appropriately rid of sentimentality, this might simply be Spielberg’s toughest film to date. And with his impeccable execution, he does not disappoint. It gets a bit too hard to watch at times, but the dedication to this unflinching retelling of a dark past makes for a really discomforting cinematic piece.

4

Best Performance: Eric Bana as Avner Kaufman
Best Scene: Avner making love to his wife as he recalls the massacre

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4. Good Night, and Good Luck

With a high level of craftsmanship present in its strong sense of style, the film substantiates it with a gripping story of the fight for the truth. Strong performances from the ensemble make the film much more involving.

4

Best Performance: David Strathairn as Edward Murrow
Best Scene: That long take when we first see the TV station

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3. Brokeback Mountain

The film gets this rating and this spot not because of the ‘landmark film’ status which I do not necessarily subscribe to, but because it has a very rich emotional core. The film is not just a compelling love story of two men, but it is also a multi-dimensional societal examination that feels personal and intimate.

5

Best Performance: Heath Ledger as Ennis del Mar
Best Scene: Ennis and Jack reunited

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2. Crash

An extremely engaging and fascinating look at how the space between people eventually becomes their connection. Energetic and ultimately relevant, the film fearlessly pinpoints what has become of the people to itself and to the bigger whole where it is a part. Strong performances populate this great film.

5

Best Performance: Michael Peña as Daniel Ruiz
Best Scene: The shop owner accidentally shooting at the locksmith’s daughter

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1. Capote

How this film reached this spot still surprises me. It is not as flashy as the other nominees. In fact, the film is told in a subtle but intensely disquieting manner that has affected me more than any of the other movies in this roster. Its exquisite filmmaking is very evident, and the film contains one of the greatest male performances ever in cinematic history. It is a film that must be given more notice.

5

Best Performance: Philip Seymour Hoffman as Truman Capote
Best Scene: The prisoner retelling the murder

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Like I said, I am also surprised that I ended up with Capote as my choice. 🙂 That’s why I love doing this project – I discover my love for films I never thought I would.

Clues for the next year (which I will introduce tomorrow):

  • “Huuurts….. huuurts….. huuurts…..”
  • “____ fuck yourself.”
  • “Look down, look down!”
  • “You’re harassing me! He is harassing me!”

What’s you pick? Do you agree with the Academy, or with me, or you have a different choice?

 
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