THE VERDICT – Best Motion Picture: 2002

So, here are the results (AT LAST!).

I kept switching #5 and #4, but I’m already comfortable with their placements here. Deciding for the best movie was the hardest thing I did for this project yet. All of them were worthy to win, but it all boiled down to my most favored ones, which happens to be the top 3. Basically, this has been the best year I have reviewed so far, having all of these movies as certified classics.

You can just click on the titles for their profiles.

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5. Gangs of New York

It actually makes me sad that I need to rank this one as the lowest. Nevertheless, the film is one of those true epics that transports you to another time and place and makes each scene engaging by giving outstanding performances. The ending – definitely one of the best ever.

 
Best Performance: Daniel Day-Lewis as William “The Butcher” Cutting
Best Scene: Just like what I said, the ending scene

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4. The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

Another epic here, the film’s journey towards the end is a thrilling ride that delivers lots of human emotions in the same way that the first film did. It is a dark movie compared to its predecessor, but it never becomes a hindrance for it to be fully enjoyable. The war scene in the climax must be witnessed to be believed.

Best Performance: Andy Serkis as Gollum
Best Scene: Battle at Helm’s Deep

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3. The Hours

Very artsy in storytelling, the film is daring for putting all the stakes on the emotions of the characters. The emotional roller-coaster ride may seem to always be downwards, but it effectively delivers that. The performances and the direction raise this film to a point that it becomes uplifting.

Best Performance: Julianne Moore as Laura Brown
Best Scene: The intense opening credits

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2. The Pianist

If being artsy is The Hours’ way of delivering the drama, The Pianist goes to the painfully raw way. The film is beautiful, but it does not glamorize the situation, bringing a very visceral feeling of despair that is anchored to Adrien Brody’s powerful performance.

Best Performance: Adrien Brody as Wladyslaw Szpilman
Best Scene: The family watching from the window the murder from the other building

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1. Chicago

With two epics and two heavy dramas in the bag, I decided to go with the musical extravaganza. Its lasting freshness and reverberating energy, biting screenplay, clever direction, strong performances, and mindblowing musical numbers, this movie gets my vote as the best of the year. This was not an easy choice for the win, but I’m happy with this.

Best Performance: Catherine Zeta-Jones as Velma Kelly
Best Scene: The ‘Cell Block Tango’ musical sequence

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Maybe it took some of you as a surprise that I picked Chicago for the win. As I have said a while ago, it could have been any of these five films, so my denominator became the attachment factor, and Chicago gets that for me.

Nobody was able to guess it right (nice try, DerekB 🙂  ), so the next year is already set. Clues for the next year:

  • Suppressed love
  • Murder story in paper
  • Los Angeles and its people

What’s you pick? Do you agree with the Academy, or with me, or you have a different choice?

2 thoughts on “THE VERDICT – Best Motion Picture: 2002

  1. I’ve literally never guessed a ranking correctly on this or any other blog, lol. But I always try!

    Chicago’s one of my favorite winners ever so I’m glad you loved it! This really is a great year for Best Picture. 2002 will be my next supporting year btw. 🙂

    Like

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