The 2009 TFO Awards: Technical Awards (PART 2)

Just scroll down to see my picks. I admit I’m not a pure professional in terms of the two sound categories, but I have at least an ample amount of knowledge on the definition of the categories so. . . . . still.

The categories here are:

Best Film Editing
Best Sound Mixing
Best Sound Editing
Best Original Music Score
Best Original Song
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Best Film Editing

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

2nd Place (500) Days of Summer – Alan Edward Bell

  • Brings the best of the non-linear story by bringing energy to it by its pace. And it’s not just inspired by Annie Hall!

District 9 – Julian Clarke

  • It immerses audience into the feeling of being there with all of those documentary style parts.

1st Place The Hurt Locker – Chris Innis and Bob Murawski

  • Every scene where they defuse the bomb is nail-biting. It chooses to go with the epic feeling in editing without being showy. Delivers the whole nerve-wrecking experience with power.

3rd Place Inglourious Basterds – Sally Menke

  • Like any other great epic film, it was able to avoid the “boring 3-hour epic” cliché. But it also shades the film with modern style. So brilliant!

A Single Man – Joan Sobel

  • Was able to compress a lot of greatness in its short length. And what an editing! It thrilled me. And with the cinematography… What a pair!

Runners-up: Up in the Air | Up | In the Loop | Fantastic Mr. Fox | Nine

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Best Sound Mixing

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

3rd Place The Hurt Locker

  • Wonderfully mixes the loudness of the event to the tense silence that surfaces in the scenes.

1st Place Inglourious Basterds

  • Its wonderfully hip score mixed with the delicious dialogue is a feast. The music and the sound here is subtle but definitely outstanding.

The Road

  • The sound completely evokes sense of threatening pacification of the apocalypse. It gets loud, but it always grounds in quietness.

Star Trek

  • Maybe it’s a job normal for sci-fi films, but the machines mixed with the dialogue while the score blends in harmoniously . . . . .

2nd Place Up

  • If you have a majestically magical score and  masterfully written dialogue, all you need to have is flawless blending of the two. Here’s it.

Runners-up: Avatar | Up in the Air | A Single Man | Nine | Angels and Demons

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Best Sound Editing

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

3rd Place Avatar

  • When you create your own world, all of the sounds must be out of this world. And it was. . .

District 9

  • Forget the alien sound you normally know. Prawns have their own way. And it’s chilling to hear it.

2nd Place The Hurt Locker

  • You hear heavy breathing and some metals hitting each other, and yet, all of those small details actually gave a lot to the film’s impact.

Star Trek

  • It could have pulled some inspiration from previous Star Trek movies, or even say, previous sci-fi films. But it sounds fresh all the way.

1st Place Up

  • Just hear Dug’s multilingual collar. No need for further discussion.

Runners-up: Inglourious Basterds | Drag Me to Hell | Zombieland | Sherlock Holmes | Where the Wild Things Are

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Best Original Music Score

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

Broken Embraces – Alberto Iglesias

  • It’s more than a melodramatic music with shades of Spanish accents. It’s enveloped in mystery.

3rd Place Fantastic Mr. Fox – Alexandre Desplat

  • The banjos create a very vibrant feeling. And the feeling of hominess is delivered throughout. It’s more than quirky.

The Hurt Locker – Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders

  • Simply as harrowing as the movie it is in. Enhances the nightmarish aura of the film.

2nd Place A Single Man – Abel Korzeniowski

  • It can be seen either as strings abuse or strings power. I prefer to call it as the latter one, as the strings are definitely in the mind of the lead.

1st Place Up – Michael Giacchino

  • The adventure is there, right there! But it’s more than that! The subtlety of the crisis of the lead character is evidently mixed with the co-lead’s innocence.

Runners-up: Julie and Julia | Cheri | The Road | The Last Station | Public Enemies

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Best Original Song

Here are my nominees.

“All is Love” – Where the Wild Things Are

  • Celebrates how delightful it is to be a child – full of L-O-V-E!

1st Place “Cinema Italiano” – Nine

  • Go ahead, hate me. But I just can’t get enough of this song.

2nd Place “Take It All” – Nine

  • Wonderfully rendered by the emotionally bruised Luisa Contini.

“The Weary Kind” – Crazy Heart

  • Whoever version you would choose, you would still get a song from the heart of the wounded soul of Bad Blake.

3rd Place “You Got Me Wrapped Around Your Little Finger” – An Education

  • Perfectly describes the feeling of delight Jenny has in David’s arms.

Runners-up: “Smoke Without Fire” – An Education | “Help Yourself” – Up in the Air | “Petey’s Song” – Fantastic Mr. Fox | “Somebody Else” – Crazy Heart | “Down in New Orleans” – The Princess and the Frog

Special Mention: “Loin de Paname” – Paris 36

I very much love this song. But it’s ineligible for the award because I haven’t seen the film yet. So, as a recognition of this song’s greatness, I give it a special mention.

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So, halfway to go! I’m hurrying up because I have to do my predictions before the OSCARS ! ! ! ! !

Next is the acting categories with a special award.

Do you agree with my choices or rankings? Or not? Please drop in your comments! 🙂

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