The 2009 TFO Awards: Technical Awards (PART 1)

Just scroll down to see my picks.

The categories here are:

Best Costume Design
Best Contemporary Costume Design
Best Art Direction
Best Make-Up and Hairstyling
Best Visual Effects
Best Cinematography
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Best Costume Design

Here are my nominees (click picture to enlarge):

Cheri – Consolata Boyle

  • Its gorgeous designs fitting the film’s surprisingly light and subtle but serious mood is mesmerizing to watch. And to have the stunning Pfeiffer to actually carry it with grace!

1st Place Inglourious Basterds – Anna B. Sheppard

  • For all the kinds of clothes that it needed – for the soldiers, for workers, for actresses, for interpreters, and for theater owners – it does the job excellently. Every piece of clothing is a killer.

2nd Place Nine – Colleen Atwood

  • Maybe it’s already a given fact that the deliciousness of the clothes come from the fact that he story was set in show business. But with all those costumes, it’s very easy to be stunned.

3rd Place A Single Man – Arianne Phillips

  • The clothes express emotions and we get to actually see the lead character’s POV with the clothes. Almost pure Matthew Goode in white and glowing Nicholas Hoult compliments very well with the camera.

The Young Victoria – Sandy Powell

  • For a known designer like her, this may not seem to be much of a challenge. And added to that is the film was just okay. But forget about it. It’s an eye candy!

Runners-up: Bright Star | An Education | The Last Station

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Best Contemporary Costume Design

Since almost all of award giving bodies that recognize costume design ignore contemporary films (with I Am Love and The Devil Wears Prada being the only exceptions), I allotted this category only to contemporary films who have impressed me with their costume work. I’m no genius in costume design (I’m bad at drawing!), but I have a taste in clothes (that’s subjective, though). šŸ˜€

Here are my nominees (click picture to enlarge):

1st Place (500) Days of Summer – Hope Hanafin

  • Does a very great job in making this romance a very believable one. It brings style with reality and it blends so well. Notice Summer’s vibrant dreaminess going along with Tom’s slick formality.

In the Loop – Ross Little

  • SUITS PARADE # 1 – The guys here are only in suit or in military uniform, and the girls are in their formal clothes too. But those clothes speak of their attitude. And really appealing business attires.

2nd Place Julia – April Napier

  • The lead character’s fate may be doomed, but her clothes aren’t.Ā  Napier brings style to this diva character from the first scene. Even if things already went wrong, the clothes still doesn’t.

The Ugly Truth – Betsy Heimann

  • Alright. Maybe the film isn’t really that good. But Katherine Heigl really shines and her beauty is totally enriched by her simple but definitely classy clothes.

3rd Place Up in the Air – Danny Glicker

  • SUITS PARADE # 2 – The guys here only wear suits. But the girls – wow! Especially Farmiga, whose sexiness she completely embodies in her clothes. And Clooney’s suits always bring gloominess and isolation.

Runners-up: Duplicity | It’s Complicated | Crazy Heart

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Best Art Direction

Here are my nominees (click picture to enlarge):

1st Place Inglourious Baterds – David Wasco (AD), Sandy Reynolds-Wasco (SD)

  • Totally brings you to the place. From the farm to the movie theater, you’re definitely in there. It’s one great time there.

3rd Place Nine – John Myhre (AD), Gordon Sim (SD)

  • There is one set that they use for the musical scenes. But each one presents creativity and difference from the rest. And the rest. . . . .

The Road – Chris Kennedy (AD), Robert Greenfield (SD)

  • The challenge of making all look destroyed seem impossible. But every piece of fallen stuff scattered there add up to the terror it brings.

2nd Place Sherlock Holmes – Sarah Greenwood (AD), Katie Spencer (SD)

  • I didn’t fully love the film. But the design is dead-on great. It’s a fantastic work from the production. The mystery is raised too.

A Single Man – Dan Bishop (AD), Amy Wells (SD)

  • The gloominess of the lead character can be seen with the set without being obvious. And the 60’s is so in there . . . . .

Runners-up: District 9 | An Education | Where the Wild Things Are | The Young Victoria | The Last Station

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Best Make-Up and Hairstyling

I added the hairstyling because it’s easier for me to nominate films if I also consider the hairstyling, not just the make up.

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

1st Place District 9

  • Wikus’ horrible (and yet, believable) transformation from human to prawn is chilling and amazing to see.

3rd Place Hunger

  • It’s as disturbing as the film and as intense as Fassbender’s performance. He did his own job at making himself thin, but the cuts and bruises. Definitely not for the squeamish!

Inglourious Basterds

  • Glamor is served well to Bridget and especially Shoshanna. But the war scars are subtle yet noticeable.

Julia

  • From the noisy party to her final plea, Swinton’s drastic change from relaxed to tired is evident in her good make-up work.

2nd Place The Road

  • Malnourishment, sleeplessness, anxiety, stress, sorrow, devastation – all in the character’s faces. Especially Viggo’s.

Runners-up: Zombieland | Orphan | The Young Victoria

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Best Visual Effects

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

3rd Place Avatar

  • The characters themselves are a landmark. And Pandora is undeniably captivating. This is how visual effects work big time!

1st Place District 9

  • It’s amazing to see how seamlessly the aliens were integrated to reality. Never did I ever felt that they were actually VFX.

The Road

  • The effects of the apocalypse are a horror to watch. The actors can handle it already, but the effects create horror in landscapes.

Star Trek

  • Maybe it’s not really a milestone in visual effects. But they were certainly cool. And the spaceships are wonderful to see.

2nd Place Where the Wild Things Are

  • When the VFX is as subtle as the story, what you have is a very natural creation of impossible characters to life.

Runners-up: Terminator Salvation | Amelia | Sherlock Holmes

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Best Cinematography

Here are my nominees (click photo to enlarge):

3rd Place Bright Star – Greig Fraser

  • Maybe I was somewhat indifferent with the film, but nevertheless, it can’t stop me from the fact that it was so beautifully shot, complimenting to the poetic mood of the film.

Broken Embraces – Rodrigo Prieto

  • Like the film, the cinematography tends to arouse the interest of viewers by giving questions and mysteries, not answers and solutions. And every shot add up to the plot.

The Hurt Locker – Barry Ackroyd

  • It’s no stylish cinematography, but it definitely captures the experience of piercing heat and pulse-pounding events seen in different people’s point of view.

2nd Place Inglourious Basterds – Robert Richardson

  • The style here is evident, but it is not distracting. Simple camera moves push every inch of tension it can bring every second. It makes the film a continuously moving visual treat.

1st Place A Single Man – Eduard Grau

  • Not everyone dug the style used in the film. But I simply did. I loved it. Differing saturation on different scenes, crafty shots bringing unspeakable and unexpected beauty. Maybe too much, but I love every minute of it.

Runners-up: Nine | Hunger | Where the Wild Things Are | An Education | The Road

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So, do you agree with my choices or rankings? Or not? Please drop in your comments! Second post for the awards will be about TECHNICAL AWARDS (Part 2) including Film Editing, Sound Awards, and Music Awards. Stay tuned!

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